Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #8005
    Steven Konecny
    Spectator

    I don’t see anything for pull out shelves, which are pretty common these days. Can I trick the software into drawing the holes for these by simply adding some amount to the first offset? How can I make it draw the door, too?

    #8006
    Lynn Hinman
    Spectator

    Steven,
    I have the ability to export it to my CNC so I do the work in that program. I create a cabinet with the doors and since my pull outs are only two sizes, I open and export them into the DXF layout. Per my previous emails with them, I believe they do not support this for this version, it will come out in a future version.

    Lynn Hinman

    #8010
    Steven Konecny
    Spectator

    Thanks Lynn,
    I found your post after looking through the forum a little.
    I use Vectric software, too, but I’m not all that great at editing the files inside VCarve. I primarily use it to import DXF’s from something else, make toolpaths and nest parts. I am, however, pretty familiar with Sketchup and Fusion 360. I find the layout and measuring tools in VCarve to be so lacking, I actively avoid making changes to drawings with their software. I’m sure it’s something I could learn, but, meh.
    If I can use Sketchup to draw the holes, that would work out better for me; I already have tons of Sketchup hole templates that I can simply merge into the part. I can move the holes to a drilling layer in Vcarve after importing the DXF easy enough, assuming it will include the changes I make.
    Sure would be awesome if I didn’t need to do so much cleanup work, though.

    Steve

    #8011
    Lynn Hinman
    Spectator

    Steve,

    While I have been using SketchUp for over 6 years, I have been doing work on my CNC for over 8 years and work on my files there. With the DXF import and the ability to have everything automated, it makes it great. I use to do most of my design work in Sketchup but now use it with CabWriter. The ability to provide the customer perspectives as well as layout views is something that with the combination of the two programs, I had problems doing before. It was a learning curve but is well worth it. I had to draw many versions to get it right, but it is second nature now. Cabinets are not my primary business. I do more 2.5D work and contract out to other builders to do their jobs. I have a large shop by most standards – 2000sqf and I am building a 5000sqf shop, mostly furniture design and one of a kind builds. I will also start teaching again with the larger shop – between 4-6 benches. I also have a large format 100 watt laser that I do a lot of work with. With version 2.0, the support for dado/rabbet and tongue and groove carcass construction, including captured backs is a big thing for me. I do more raised panel doors than flat panels which is gaining popularity because of the simple lines that customers like. Like you, there were changes I had to make with their system – like the ladder base. I previously did my toe kicks with the bottom housed in a dado. The ladder sure makes it easier to level the base. I started with the pony face clamps and drilled my face frames together with that system. For the price, you cannot beat the features and speed of drawing once you learn the system. They listen and take your input, so if it is not there, it may be added at a later date as they continue to improve the system.

    #8015
    cabwriter
    Keymaster

    Hi Steve,

    Great conversation; thanks Lynn, for your input.

    In terms of the pullout shelves, you have a couple of options, which start with drawing a Divided Base cabinet. See this tutorial video for how to do that:

    This type of cabinet allows you to have a multi-bay cabinet of any height, but it doesn’t automatically draw the doors or drawers; you use the Door or Drawer tool for that, which gives you more flexibility. This video covers those tools:

    Once you’ve drawn the divided base to your liking, you could simply use the Door tool to add doors, then use SketchUp to punch holes for drawer slides for the pullout trays anywhere you want and you’d have the information you need on the DXF files for your cnc. If you want CabWriter to draw the drawer slide holes, you would do the following. Before using the door tool, you would draw a bunch of drawers first with a drawer face height that would select the correct drawer box height as setup in the Drawer settings tab. For example, if your pullout trays were going to be 3″ high, you would have a drawer box of that height setup in the settings tab then start drawing drawer faces using the Drawer tool that are maybe 4″ high in the spots where you want a tray. One thing you must make sure of is that you don’t draw a drawer slide hole where a hinge plate hole will go later or it will cause CabWriter to have an error. Once you’re done drawing your drawer boxes, you’ll delete the drawer fronts and use the Door tool to draw your doors.

    Let me know if this makes sense. If not, I can create a video for you to see how it works…

    Thanks,
    Greg

    #8031
    Steven Konecny
    Spectator

    Thanks Greg,
    I’m still getting my head wrapped around the basics right now. But, based on your response in another thread, it seems like I could just draw the holes for the slides in Sketchup faster. Of course, if I’m drawing the holes, I’ll be able to see right away if I’m going to hit a hinge; I could move those pretty easily, if needed.

    Thanks,
    Steve

    #8037
    cabwriter
    Keymaster

    Hi Steven,

    You’re right, if you know SketchUp well, it’s probably easier to just draw the holes after drawing the door, then like you said, you can avoid the hinge plate holes…

    Thanks,
    Greg

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.